Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research

10.01.14-11.09.14 Black Freedom, White Allies & Red Scare: Louisville, 1954

Braden poster design-11x17

Opening reception Oct. 1, 2014, 7:00 p.m.

Louisville Free Public Library, Main Branch (301 York St.)

On May 15, 1954, Andrew and Charlotte Wade and their toddler, Rosemary, moved into a house in what is now Shively. They were the only African American family in the neighborhood, and six weeks later, segregationists dynamited their home. Anne and Carl Braden, whites who were committed to labor and civil rights, had purchased the home on behalf of the Wades. The Bradens were accused of staging the home purchase and bombing as part of a communist plot to take over the government of Kentucky.

The year 2014 marks the 60th anniversary of a home purchase, bombing, and trial that would rock Louisville and the nation–and that continues to impact how we live, work, and go to school with one another today. The Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research will mark the anniversary with a series of fall events, including a collaboration with University of Louisville Archives, Louisville Free Public Library, and Courier-Journal Media. “Black Freedom, White Allies & Red Scare: Louisville, 1954,” will feature hundreds of photos and archival materials from the home purchase, trial, Carl Braden’s imprisonment, the years following the case, and events of the civil rights era that strongly impacted the case.

The opening reception will be held on Oct. 1, 2014, at 7:00 p.m. at the main branch of the Louisville Free Public Library (301 York St.) and will feature a sneak preview of a play that presents the Wades’ and Bradens’ stories and connects them to current situations surrounding race and housing. The full staging of the play, which will include a reenactment of Carl Braden’s sedition trial, will take place Friday, Oct. 24, 2014, in the Allen Courtroom at the Brandeis School of Law. The public library also is offering the following related programming:

October 7, 6:30 p.m.

Panel Discussion on the Social Construct of Race: Immigrants and the “Box” with special guest Amer Zhar: Palestinian-American scholar/comedian/filmmaker.

Iroquois Library

 

October 21, 7 p.m.

Anne Braden: Southern Patriot

Film Viewing and Panel Discussion

Main Library

 

October 22, 6 p.m.

Adult Book Discussion

The Wall Between by Anne Braden

Crescent Hill Library

 

The exhibit runs through Nov. 9, 2014. Anne Braden Institute will close out this fall semester of commemoration with structural racialization expert and University of California law and African American and ethnic studies professor john a. powell, J.D., delivering the Anne Braden Memorial Lecture on Nov. 11, 5:30 pm, at the Belknap Playhouse.

 

Download a PDF of the event poster: 8.5 x 11 size or 11 x 17 size

Posted on Tuesday, August 26th, 2014 at 3:10 pm


09.18.14 “a hard walk to dignity”: South Africa 20 Years after Apartheid

Diana Ferrus color

Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014

4:00 p.m.

Thrust Theatre, in the Studio Arts/HPES Building, 2314 S. Floyd St., Louisville, KY 40208

South African educator, poet, and theatre artist Diana Ferrus will give a spoken word performance at this International Day of Peace celebration focused on freedom in South Africa in the 20th anniversary year of the end of apartheid. A panel discussion on South African democracy featuring Ferrus, Dr. Tyler Fleming of the University of Louisville, Dr. Steve Davis of the University of Kentucky, both historians on South Africa, immediately follows the performance.  The panel also features student Amina Ahmed, who is minoring in African Studies. The event will close with a reception. Sponsored by International Diversity and Engagement Programs; Peace, Justice, and Conflict Transformation, the Anne Braden institute for Social Justice Research, and Departments of Pan African Studies, Women’s & Gender Studies, History, and Theatre Arts.

Download a PDF of the event poster (8.5 x 11 size)

Posted on Sunday, August 24th, 2014 at 12:09 pm


09.16.14 – Louisville’s ‘Most Perfect Union:’ An Examination of United Farm Equipment Workers Local 236 at International Harvester

Labor scholar Toni Gilpin speaks on a militant Louisville union from 1950s, FE-236, whose black and white leaders were early challengers of local segregation laws.

 tonigilpin_flyer (2)

2 lectures, both free and open to the public

 

Tuesday, Sept. 16, 1:00 p.m.

University of Louisville, Humanities Bldg, Room 300

 

Tuesday, Sept. 16, 6:00 p.m.

National Association of Letter Carriers, 4815 Poplar Level Rd, Louisville

 

Co-sponsored by the Kentucky Labor Institute and the University of Louisville Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research and the departments of History and Pan African Studies.

 

Toni Gilpin is a labor historian and educator. She holds a Ph.D. in American History from Yale University and currently teaches American History for the Odyssey Project, which offers humanities instruction free of charge to low-income adults. She is the co-author of “On Strike for Respect: The Clerical and Technical Workers’ Union at Yale University, 1984-85” and is now at work on a book detailing the history of the Farm Equipment Workers, the Chicago-based, uniquely left-wing union that organized International Harvester and other farm equipment manufacturers during the CIO era.

 

Download a PDF of the event flyer (8.5 x 11 size)

Posted on Tuesday, August 19th, 2014 at 10:58 am


#BradenWadeat60 and #Subversives1954

If you follow us on Twitter, you’ve seen the hashtags #BradenWadeat60 and #Subversives1954. On May 15, 1954, Andrew and Charlotte Wade and their toddler, Rosemary, moved into a house in what is now Shively. They were the only African American family in the neighborhood, and six weeks later, segregationists dynamited their home. Anne and Carl Braden, whites who were committed to labor and civil rights, had purchased the home on behalf of the Wades. The Bradens were accused of staging the home purchase and bombing as part of a communist plot to take over the government of Kentucky.

The year 2014 marks the 60th anniversary of a home purchase, bombing, and trial that would rock Louisville and the nation–and that continues to impact how we live, work, and go to school with one another today. The Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research will mark the anniversary with a series of fall events, including:

 

Also on Sept. 18th, the ABI also will be co-sponsoring the Peace Day event, “’a hard walk to dignity': South Africa 20 Years After Apartheid,” featuring a performance by South African poet/theater artist Diana Ferrus.

 

Dates, times and locations subject to change, so visit this site often for the most current information!

Posted on Friday, June 27th, 2014 at 5:07 pm


7th Annual Anne Braden Memorial Lecture

A project_progress Series Event

“Why the Past Won’t Go Away: The Crisis of History in the Age of Post-Racialism”

November 20th, 2013

5:30 PM, University of Louisville Student Activities Center Multipurpose Room

Download a flyer to share with your contacts (PDFs): Minimal Text Flyer, or Flyer with Description

khalilmuhammad9-high res

Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad

 

The history books, which have completely ignored the contribution of the Negro in American history, have only served to intensify the Negroes’ sense of worthlessness and to augment the anachronistic doctrine of white supremacy.” — Martin Luther King, Jr., Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? (1967)

 

What does it mean when history as a discipline is under attack at a time when we have a black president and murders of unarmed black teens? Schomburg Center director Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad explains how knowing the past directly relates to understanding the present race-related crises. In his talk, Dr. Muhammad is expected to respond to the Trayvon Martin assassination, the Zimmerman verdict and how we remember the March on Washington and other major historical events. While addressing issues such as mass incarceration and punitive actions against youth of color, he will focus on the present attack on historical understanding/historical literacy. Dr. Muhammad will talk about the present disinvestment in history departments, in history students and in historical learning among younger people, and how these affect both white supremacy and people of color’s perceptions of themselves.

 

Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad is director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, a research division of the New York Public Library, and a former associate professor of history at Indiana University-Bloomington. His book The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, published by Harvard University Press, won the 2011 John Hope Franklin Best Book award in American Studies. He is now working on his second book, Disappearing Acts: The End of White Criminality in the Age of Jim Crow, which traces the historical roots of the changing demographics of crime and punishment so evident today.

 

Articles by and about Dr. Muhammad:

“Help ease our history deficit” Courier-Journal, Oct. 27, 2013

“Confronting the Contradictions of America’s Past” on Moyers & Company

Interview with The Root upon his appointment to Schomburg

Video with The Root

NYT Op-Ed: Playing the ‘violence card’

 

 

 

Posted on Monday, October 28th, 2013 at 10:57 am


Special Discount Ticket Offer for “The Mountaintop” at Actors Theatre

poster_mountaintop_2013-2014Special Offer! $10 Tickets for an Olivier-award winning show about Martin Luther King, Jr.

The Mountaintop  by Katori Hall

October 8 – October 27, 2013

 

The Anne Braden Institute has partnered with Actors Theatre of Louisville to offer its supporters an exclusive $10 ticket for The Mountaintop, running October 8-27 in the Pamela Brown Auditorium. With vivid theatrical imagination and powerful emotion, playwright Katori Hall beautifully fictionalizes the final hours of Dr. King’s life in this play with a visit from a mysterious maid at the Lorraine Motel. Her presence forces Dr. King to grapple with leadership, legacy and mortality.

 

To secure your $10 ticket, simply call the Actors Theatre Box Office at 502-584-1205 and mention the Anne Braden Institute. Fees apply. Not valid on previous purchases and cannot be combined with other offers. Limit two.

Also mark your calendars for these special events associated with The Mountaintop:

 

Community Conversation

Thursday, October 17 at 6:30 p.m.

This event includes a performance of The Mountaintop followed by a post-show discussion exploring how the leadership and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. relates to our community and what civil rights means today in Louisville. The performance is used as a springboard to start a rich conversation. Tickets include a pre-show reception, performance and post-show conversation with:

·         Jean West, moderator

·         Carla Wallace

·         Raul Cunningham

***Order through group sales and mention the Anne Braden Institute for discount tickets to this event.***

 

Conversation with the Artists

Sunday, Oct. 20, following the 2:30 p.m. performance

Enjoy an engaging post-show chat with the cast of The Mountaintop, led by a member of the Actors artistic staff.

 

For details on these and other events, please visit http://actorstheatre.org/calendar/2013/10/.

For more information about The Mountaintop, visit http://actorstheatre.org/shows/the-mountaintop-2013-2014/

 

 

Actors Theatre is located across from the YUM! Center at 3rd&Main in Downtown Louisville and has a convenient parking garage attached to the facility.

Posted on Wednesday, October 9th, 2013 at 5:15 pm


Save the Date for the 7th Annual Anne Braden Memorial Lecture!

“Why the Past Won’t Go Away: The Crisis of History in the Age of Post-Racialism”

November 20th, 2013

5:30 PM, University of Louisville Student Activities Center Multipurpose Room

khalilmuhammad9-high res

Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad

 

The history books, which have completely ignored the contribution of the Negro in American history, have only served to intensify the Negroes’ sense of worthlessness and to augment the anachronistic doctrine of white supremacy.” — Martin Luther King, Jr., Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? (1967)

 

Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad is director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, a research division of the New York Public Library, and a former associate professor of history at Indiana University-Bloomington. His book The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, published by Harvard University Press, won the 2011 John Hope Franklin Best Book award in American Studies. He is now working on his second book, Disappearing Acts: The End of White Criminality in the Age of Jim Crow, which traces the historical roots of the changing demographics of crime and punishment so evident today.

 

Articles by and about Dr. Muhammad:

“Confronting the Contradictions of America’s Past” on Moyers & Company

Interview with The Root upon his appointment to Schomburg

Video with The Root

NYT Op-Ed: Playing the ‘violence card’

Posted on Friday, July 12th, 2013 at 1:08 pm


Free and Open College-Level Black History Courses

Several free, college-level courses and lecture series on black history are available online via iTunes, YouTube, and other sites. Taught by real professors at top universities, these courses and lectures are open to all who have a computer and internet access. Open Culture recommended the following courses. You can find a list of 700 free and open courses and lectures from top universities on a variety of subjects at  http://www.openculture.com/freeonlinecourses.

Introduction to African American Studies
Abdul Alkalimat, University of Illinois
http://eblackstudies.org/2010/curriculum.htm
This course was taught at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Fall 2007. All of the accompanying materials are available on the course website www.eblackstudies.org/urbana (14 videos, syllabus, listserv, and more. RealPlayer software is needed to watch the videos. Download for free at www.real.com.)

 

African American History: From Emancipation to the Present

Jonathan Holloway, Yale
http://oyc.yale.edu/african-american-studies/afam-162#sessions

 

African-American History: Modern Freedom Struggle
Clay Carson, Stanford
http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=40E11D5C66CAC48C
or
https://itunes.apple.com/itunes-u/african-american-history-modern/id384234017?mt=10#ls=1
This lecture series introduces the viewer to African-American history, with particular emphasis on the political thought and protest movements of the period after 1930, focusing on selected individuals who have shaped and been shaped by modern African-American struggles for freedom and justice. Clayborne Carson is a professor in the History Department at Stanford
University.

 

Rethinking Black Theory
Abdul Alkalimat, University of Illinois
http://ensemble.atlas.uiuc.edu/app/sites/index.aspx?destinationID=qzBpeuKc0E6NPaVC9tPfzA
This lecture series from 2011 is an introduction to various theories and methodologies rising out of the study of the Black world based on African American intellectual traditions. 45 years after Black Power posed a challenge to thinking by and about the African American experience, it is necessary to rethink this legacy of changing consciousness. This is both a look at the theoretical formulations in the academic field of Black Studies, but more importantly it is thinking about how we the people can understand and be more self determining about our consciousness and how we can reorient ourselves to the fight for freedom. Now as then, we have work to do.

 

Posted on Friday, June 14th, 2013 at 11:35 am


Get on the Bus! The Path Toward Equal Housing Opportunity

Update 5/1/2013: The Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research would like to extend a big THANK YOU to all who helped make “Get on the Bus” a success. Just under 150 people registered for the event, and Lexington Fair Housing Council, the lead sponsor and organizer of the event, turned away many more. Good news: we’re considering doing it again! Please click the link below to let us know of your interest.

I’m interested in future housing tours!

The above link will take you to a short survey designed for K-12 educators. If you are not an educator, please indicate your group or purpose for going on the tour in questions 3 and 5.

Update 4/21/2013: Check out VIDEO interviews with some of our ‘Get on the Bus: The Path Toward Equal Housing Opportunity’ tour guides: http://ow.ly/kgGT8

Get on The Bus logo pic

Get on The Bus with the ABI on April 23rd to commemorate the 45th anniversary of the federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, and to mark the official release of “Marking Louisville Home for Us All: A 20-Year Action Plan for Fair Housing.”

  • 12:30-1:15: Registration and presentation of action plan
  • 1:30: Buses depart
  • 4:00: Buses return

Buses will depart from Kentucky Center for African American Heritage (1701 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd.) at 1:30 pm to take participants on a guided tour of neighborhoods that tell the story of Louisville’s segregated housing history and its present-day effects. Prior to departure, you’ll hear a presentation of that history and see the unveiling of the 20-year action plan for fair housing.

Register online at http://www.lexingtonfairhousing.com/. The event is FREE, but space is limited. For more information, contact Arthur Crosby at (859) 971-8067, toll-free at (866) 438-8617, or e-mail crosbylfhc@hotmail.com.

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Kentucky Housing Corporation, the Louisville Metro Human Relations Commission, the Lexington Fair Housing Council, the Louisville Urban League, the NAACP, the Metropolitan Housing Coalition, the University of Louisville Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research, the Fair Housing Coalition, and the Department of Community Services and Revitalization.

Join and share the event on Facebook by clicking here.

 

Posted on Friday, March 22nd, 2013 at 3:19 pm


The Future of Whiteness

alcoff jpeg flyer

Posted on Wednesday, February 13th, 2013 at 3:50 pm


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